General Description      (approved 7/26/2010)



The Marans breed originated in France, in marshy areas close to the Atlantic coast. The
breed is named after the historic port town of Marans. Evolution of the Marans type bird is
said to have begun as early as the 13th century, with crosses between the local marsh
hens and various gamecocks brought in to the port on ships. Gradual development of the
breed then continued through the centuries, including the introduction of Brahma and
Langshan blood during the late 1800s. Marans in their modern form first began appearing
in French poultry shows in 1914. The Marans Club of France was organized in 1929, and
that club established the first standard for Marans in 1931.

Marans have been imported to the USA in small numbers for many years now, probably
beginning around the time that soldiers returned to the States after World War II. Over the
years, birds and eggs have been brought in not only from France but also from countries
such as England, Canada, Australia, and possibly Belgium and Switzerland. Importations
of "English type" clean-legged Marans have led to the establishment of many clean-legged
flocks in this country, especially in the cuckoo variety; nonetheless, the American
standard adheres to the French standard calling for lightly feathered shanks and toes.

Marans are best known for their large, russet brown eggs. This is a defining characteristic
of the Marans breed, so selection for egg color and size should never be neglected.
Physically the Marans is a medium-sized bird with the character of a rustic farm hen,
giving an impression of solidity and strength without being coarse. The legs are lightly
feathered, but leg feathering should never be excessively heavy. Eye color is bright and
clear in all varieties, never darkening into brown nor paling into yellow or pearl.

Economic Qualities (approved 7/26/10)

The Marans is a general purpose fowl for production of both meat and eggs. The breed is
most famous for its large, dark chocolate-russet eggs, but it is also known for the fine
flavor of its meat. Color of skin, white; color of egg shells, very dark reddish brown.

Disqualifications (approved 7/26/10)

Yellow on shanks or toes. White ear lobes. Pearl or black eyes. Absence of feathers on
shanks.

(See General Disqualifications and Cutting for Defects.)
Standard Weights (approved 6/11/10)

Cock….…..8 lbs         Hen……6 1/2 lbs
Cockerel….7lbs          Pullet…..5 1/2 lbs

Bantam Weights (proposed 5/24/2011)

Cock 32 ounces            Hens 28 ounces
Cockerels 28 ounces       Pullets 24 ounces
The Male - Shape   (approved 6/11/10)

COMB:   Single, moderately large, straight, upright, evenly serrated with five points; the
blade not touching the neck.

BEAK:   Long, stout and well curved.

FACE:   Smooth, skin fine and soft in texture.

EYES:   Large and prominent.

WATTLES:   Medium in size, oval, skin fine in texture.

EAR-LOBES:   Average in size, long.

HEAD:   Moderate in size, slightly flattened on top, and long.

NECK:   Moderately long and full, arched. Hackle abundant, flowing well over the shoulders.

BACK:   Wide at the shoulders, long, flat, slightly tilted to the rear. Slightly more inclined
than that of the female.
Saddle feathers -- abundant, saddle large and slightly raised.

TAIL:   Full, rather short, carried at an angle of 45 degrees above horizontal.
Main tail feathers -- broad and overlapping, shorter than average.
Sickles -- shorter than average.

WINGS:   Short, held close to the body, carriage nearly horizontal.
Primaries and secondaries -- broad and overlapping in natural order when wing is folded.

BREAST:   Strong, broad, and full. Well rounded when viewed from both the front and side.

BODY AND FLUFF:   Body -- deep, long and broad, especially through the shoulders which
are carried high.
Overall, rectangular in shape.
Fluff -- medium in length.

LEGS and TOES:   Legs set well apart and straight when viewed from the front.
Lower thighs -- strong and well feathered.
Shanks -- medium length, stout, and straight; lightly feathered down the outer sides.
Toes -- four long and well-separated toes on each foot. Outer toes lightly feathered, middle
toes free from feathers.

PLUMAGE:   Moderately tight and smooth textured.

The Female - Shape   (approved 7/09/10)

COMB:  Single, smaller than that of the male; straight and upright, evenly serrated with five
points, and fine in texture.

No female in or near production with the rear portion of the comb lopped should be
discriminated against.

BEAK:   Long, stout and well curved.

FACE:   Smooth, skin fine and soft in texture.

EYES:   Large and prominent.

WATTLES:   Medium in size, oval.

EAR-LOBES:   Average in size, long.

HEAD:   Moderate in size, slightly flattened on top, and long.

BACK:   Wide at the shoulders, long, flat, and slightly tilted to the rear. Slightly less inclined
than that of the male.

NECK:   Moderately long and full, arched.

TAIL:   Full, rather short, carried at an angle of 45 degrees above horizontal.
Main tail feathers -- broad and overlapping, shorter than average.

WINGS:   Short, held close to the body, carriage nearly horizontal.
Primaries and secondaries -- broad and overlapping in natural order when wing is folded.

BREAST:   Strong, broad, and full. Well rounded when viewed from both the front and side.

BODY AND FLUFF:   Body -- deep, long and broad, especially through the shoulders which
are carried high.
Should be more rounded than the male.
Fluff -- medium in length.

LEGS AND TOES:   Legs set well apart, straight when viewed from the front.
Lower Thighs -- strong and well feathered.
Shanks -- medium length, stout, and straight; lightly feathered down the outer sides.
Toes -- four long and well-separated toes on each foot. Outer toes lightly feathered, middle
toes free from feathers..

PLUMAGE:   Moderately tight and smooth textured.